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Pregnant women baby bump CVM status

CMV status – What is it and how can it affect me and my baby?

In your search for a sperm donor, you have probably come across the term CMV status (CMV Positive or CMV Negative). But what does CMV status mean and is it something that should concern you?

In this blog post, we will help you understand what it is when you should use a sperm donor with a positive CMV status or a donor with a negative CMV status, and how the status may affect you or your baby. Hopefully, the post will give you the information you need to make the process of finding a sperm donor as stress-free as possible.

What is CMV status?

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is related to the herpes virus and is a common virus that can affect anyone. You can get infected through body fluids such as saliva, blood, urine, sperm and breast milk. Most people have a positive CMV status before turning 50 and most people will get infected with CMV during their 20’s.

If you get infected, the virus will remain in your body for life. Most people are not aware that they are infected because the immune system usually controls the virus and therefore, you do not have any symptoms or complications. This means that the virus lies dormant in the body, with little risk of reoccurring or reactivated infection. This is known as a recurrent CMV infection.

There is no vaccine for CMV, but as mentioned, the chances are very small for this virus to become active. Normally, there are no symptoms, especially not for children. A few can have symptoms such as sore throat, fever and headache.

Does CMV affect your baby

CMV status – screening of sperm donors

At Cryos, we screen all our sperm donors for a wide variety of viruses and genetic disorders. We also screen our donors for their CMV status to accommodate use in certain countries. Specific antibodies can be detected when CMV is in the body. We accept donors who have tested IgM negative. This means that the donor does not have an active CMV infection and the donor will have a negative CMV status in the Donor Search.

Sperm donors who are tested IgG Positive, which means they have previously had the infection, may only be used for women who themselves are IgG Positive. This means that if you have previously been infected with CMV, you can use a sperm donor with a positive CMV status.

It is not all countries that require a CMV screening, so the donors who have no CMV status shown on their donor profile in the Donor Search have not and will not be screened for CMV.

What are the chances of transmitting the infection to my baby?

It depends on when you became infected the first time.

Approximately 50% of all women already have antibodies to CMV before they get pregnant because they have already been infected. As previously mentioned, this is called a recurrent CMV infection and the risk of passing the virus to your baby during a recurrent infection is very low (about 1 %). So, if you got your first CMV infection before your pregnancy, the risk of passing on the virus to your baby is very small.

However, if you are infected with CMV for the very first time during pregnancy, the chance of passing on the virus to your baby is higher.

Will my baby be affected by a positive CMV status?

Infection with CMV is mostly harmless. Most babies with a CMV infection never show signs or have any health problems. A very small percentage of babies infected with CMV may have health problems that are apparent at birth or develop later during infancy or childhood.

If you want to know more about the subject, we recommend that you speak with your doctor or clinic for advice and consider having yourself screened to see if you are a carrier of the CMV virus.

For more information about choosing the right sperm donor, you might also be interested in reading what to consider when picking your sperm donor.

Related posts

Toyah and her family Toyah and her husband had three children thanks to a sperm donor The worlds first IVF baby Louise Brown with Cryos CEO Peter Reeslev Louise was the world’s first IVF baby – she has visited Cryos Baby feet - World Fertility Day World Fertility Day – 10 things to know about fertility Allan Pacey Why men should take their reproductive biology seriously Why men should take their reproductive biology seriously

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  1. Grey says:

    I am a man and was diagnosed of Cmv, i would like to know, if i can ever have a health children in the future? Are they drugs that i need to take, if i want to make my wife pregnant that will weaken the virus.
    Thanks.

    1. Cryos says:

      Hi Grey,
      Thank you for your inquiry. We encourage you to contact your doctor or healthcare professional to discuss your CMV status and any implications it may have on future pregnancies.
      /Mila

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